Packin’

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Spring is knocking on the door here in the Rockies, and we’re pumped to be back in the mountains! With the occasional cold spell and several wet snows, winter isn’t quite over yet. Nonetheless, with a few nice breaks in the weather, roots are thawed, and we’re back in action.

To celebrate Backcountry’s kick-off to spring 2017 we’re sharing a collection of photo’s from the past several years packing out trees! You may have seen several of these before, but we never get tired of the amazing scenery we’re blessed to work in.

Before we get to the pack photo’s how about a couple of killer trees:

We just shared this insane Pinus Flexilis ( Limber pine) on “facebook” yesterday, but here it is again in case you missed it. If you ask us, this is quite possibly one of the most exceptional limber pines in the country; certainly one of Backcountry’s Best! Steve found quite a few great limbers last year, so keep an eye out for this tree and more on the website later this spring.

Count yourselves lucky that Steve found this one… because I don’t think I could let it go if it had been me! But Steve’s generous like that. 🙂

Dubbed ‘Beastie’

Beastie pack photo’s:

I packed this large Rocky Mountain Juniper from a couple of years ago. Because I can’t let Steve have all of the glory!… lol. But in all fairness he had an epic 2016 collecting season; while I was experiencing fatherhood for the first time, which was epic in it’s own right. I still made it out enough to find a few great trees too though (and Steve brought me trees to pot while he went searching for more). 🙂

You can now find this tree in the collection of Bjorn Bjorholm, and if you want to see it in person or have a hand in working on it sign up for his classes!

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Here’s another killer RMJ we spent a bit of time investigating this spring. We did a bit of root work, and decided to leave it for now. It may be collectible in the future, but it was wiser to leave it this time than risk loosing the major root mass.

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On to the rest of the packin’ photo’s!

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As always, Thank you for following us! We’re excited to have you join us for another year of adventure and beautiful trees!!!

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Blessings,

Backcountry Bonsai

Dan

Ponderosa Page Updated with New Trees!

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Check out these large ponderosa pines that didn’t get loaded on to the site this spring! All great trees! (Keep in mind that shipping will not be cheap on the large trees.)

This link will take you directly to the Ponderosa page on our website for more pictures: https://backcountrybonsai.squarespace.com/ponderosa/

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2016 Junipers

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The juniper page is updated with 15 new Rocky Mountain Junipers! Here are some photo’s, but you’ll need to visit the website to see everything. http://www.backcountrybonsai.com/juniper/

Enjoy! All are junipers with great bonsai potential, and several are world class trees.

More trees will be added soon. The Ponderosa page will be the largest, but we’ll be adding spruce, fir and Limber pines as well.

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Make sure you visit the website to see full 360 pic’s of each tree! 🙂

2016 Teaser!

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It’s finally almost time! The trees are all out of their winter beds and we’ve been photographing them. I’m prepping all of the photo’s now and plan to have new trees on the website this weekend! But I thought I’d release a few photo’s now to hopefully appease you momentarily and to get everyone excited… 😉

Last year quite a few trees sold before ever making the website from people visiting and nurseries buying in bulk; this year will be different. Expect to see a lot more trees available! 🙂

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You all seemed to like the blue door…. so we’re using it for some of the trees this year. Hope you enjoy, and keep an eye out for trees this weekend!

Blessings,
Dan

Steve’s Ponderosa

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Hello everyone! Just to break the silence and let you all know that we haven’t fallen off a cliff.. here’s a short post. This is a ponderosa pine that Steve collected (I believe in 2012, but he can correct me if I’m wrong). It was styled by Owen Reich in the spring of 2014, and then potted with Michael Hagedorn this spring. I think it’s coming along great! Enjoy. 🙂

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The shots below are this trees progression over the last few years. Owen did some serious bending to compact the crown. He hardly removed anything.. if anything.. from the tree, but still managed a nice compact design. Great work Owen! 🙂

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Keep an eye on the blog and the website. There should be new trees available either late this month or early May!
http://www.backcountrybonsai.com

Happy Spring!
Blessings,
Dan

The Artisans Cup Retrospective

My only regret about the Artisans Cup was that, being a vendor, I didn’t have time to really slow down to appreciate and study the trees. I was able to take several walks through the exhibit but they always felt rushed as I needed to get back to my booth. Thankfully this amazing site provides the opportunity to re-gain most of what I felt I missed, plus a lot more!

This is Jonas’ great write up about the site. And if you ask me, the site is worth every penny! 🙂

Dan

A Second Cork-Bark Ponderosa

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Late last spring I stumbled upon a second Ponderosa Pine, within about a mile of the first, also featuring very obvious corking bark. Many of the wings on this one are even larger! I’m hopeful, with two in the area so far, that I might be able to find a bonsai worthy/available candidate. We’ll see, and if nothing else I’ll take a few scions and graft them to Ponderosa seedlings.

I’m doing some research in hopes of finding out more about these corked trees. When/if I find any good information I’ll be sure to pass it along. The corking on this second tree has developed very similarly to the first tree I found, so I’m fairly certain that they must either share some genes, or have been infected or damaged in the same way. I really don’t know what exactly causes this corking, but I’m hopeful that some of the forestry crowd out there may have answers.

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Enjoy the pictures!

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I brought a couple of small dead branches home from this one.

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Stay tuned, and If any of you have more information on this subject I’d love to learn more.

Blessings,
Dan